Last love dating kazakhstan

There are three main theories as to why the move was made.The first theory contends that the move was for geopolitical, strategic reasons.The newly independent Republic of Kazakhstan ranks ninth in the world in geographic size (roughly the size of Western Europe) and is the largest country in the world without an ocean port.

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The Kazakh steppeland, north of the Tien Shan Mountains, south of Russian Siberia, west of the Caspian Sea, and east of China, has been inhabited since the Stone Age.

It is a land rich in natural resources, with recent oil discoveries putting it among the world leaders in potential oil reserves.

Kazakhstan, which officially became a full Soviet socialist republic in 1936, was an important but often neglected place during Soviet times.

It was to Kazakhstan that Joseph Stalin exiled thousands of prisoners to some of his most brutal gulags.

The picture is further complicated by the fact that many Kazakhs and non-Kazakhs are struggling (out of work and living below the poverty level).

Democracy and independence have been hard sells to a people who grew accustomed to the comforts and security of Soviet life. Kazakhstan, approximately 1 million square miles (2,717,300 square kilometers) in size, is in Central Asia, along the historic Silk Road that connected Europe with China more than two thousand years ago.

The final theory holds that the Kazakh government wanted to repatriate the north with Kazakhs.

Moving the capital to the north would move jobs (mostly held by Kazakhs) and people there, changing the demographics and lessening the likelihood of the area revolting or of Russia trying to reclaim it. The population of Kazakhstan was estimated to be 16,824,825 in July 1999.

Given the emigration, Kazakhstan's ethnic make up is ever-changing.

For 1999 the best estimates were Kazakhs 46 percent, Russians 34.7 percent, Ukrainians 4.9 percent, Germans 3.1 percent, Uzbeks 2.3 percent, Tartar 1.9 percent, and others 7.1 percent.

Since Almaty is near the borders with China and Kyrgyzstan (which is a friend but too close to the Islamic insurgent movements of Tajikistan and Afghanistan), this theory maintains that the new, central location provides the government with a capital city well separated from its neighbors.