Radioactivity in geologic dating

Most people think that radioactive dating has proven the earth is billions of years old.

After all, textbooks, media, and museums glibly present ages of millions of years as fact.

If we know the number of radioactive parent atoms present when a rock formed and the number present now, we can calculate the age of the rock using the decay constant.The number of parent atoms originally present is simply the number present now plus the number of daughter atoms formed by the decay, both of which are quantities that can be measured.As a result, rocks that record its earliest history have not been found and probably no longer exist.Nevertheless, there is substantial evidence that the Earth and the other bodies of the Solar System are 4.5-4.6 billion years old, and that the Milky Way Galaxy and the Universe are older still.By 1907 study of the decay products of uranium (lead and intermediate radioactive elements that decay to lead) demonstrated to B. Boltwood that the lead/uranium ratio in uranium minerals increased with geologic age and might provide a geological dating tool.

As radioactive Parent atoms decay to stable daughter atoms (as uranium decays to lead) each disintegration results in one more atom of the daughter than was initially present and one less atom of the parent.

Different methods of radiometric dating vary in the timescale over which they are accurate and the materials to which they can be applied.

All ordinary matter is made up of combinations of chemical elements, each with its own atomic number, indicating the number of protons in the atomic nucleus.

They point to a catastrophic origin for granites, consistent with the biblical timeframe for earth history and God’s judgment during the Flood.

Its crust is continually being created, modified, and destroyed.

Many geologists claim that radiometric “clocks” show rocks to be millions of years old.