Shipmates dating show

The person behind the screen could hear their answers and voices but not see them during the gameplay, although the audience could see the contestants.

The various suitors were able to describe their rivals in uncomplimentary ways, which made the show work well as a general devolution of dignity.

Questions were often obviously rigged to get ridiculous responses, or be obvious allusions to features of the participants' private areas.

"Shipmates", the dating show that pairs up singles on a three-day blind date on a paradise cruise ship, is actually pretty funny.I think the idea of the show is ok, but what makes the show "no class" are the idiots they pair up.The show featured an unusual plot twist: eight of the men from the show's original dating pool were actually heterosexual men pretending to be homosexual; one important part of the plot was whether the gay contestant would be able to recognize the heterosexual men.Some gay and straight romances have been sparked on the other reality game shows, suggesting that they too may really be "dating shows" in disguise.Most of the time, the singles involved on the date have a good first day with each other, but by the second day, they're practically fighting.

Both singles have video diaries and they let loose something fierce on each other.

There are also reports of mercenary practice, that is, members of one sex paid to participate in the game to attain balance of sex ratio.

The first gay version of these more realistic shows to receive mainstream attention was Boy Meets Boy, with a format similar to that of The Bachelor and The Bachelorette.

Cable television revived some interest in these shows during the 1980s and 1990s, and eventually new shows began to be made along the old concepts.

Variations featuring LGBT contestants began to appear on a few specialty channels.

Gimmicks were the lifeblood of all such shows, which drew criticisms for instigating disaffection that could not have been effected.